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And the Nominees for The 2013 Literary Fauxscars are…

January 10, 2013 in Fauxscars, Fiction, Film, Literary Movies

After much debate, multiple trips to the movie theater, and frequent log-ins to our Netflix accounts, we have researched our way through classic novels, young adult favorites, and everything in between, to choose the best film adaptations of 2012.

Did your favorites make the cut?  Find out below!

And don’t forget to cast your votes via our PollFacebookTwitter, or in the comment section below!  If you’d prefer a ‘secret ballot’, then send your selections by e-mail.  Make sure your voice is heard!

Unless you’re a member of the Academy that other  award show may be out of your hands, but the Literary Fauxscars are up to you!  Check back often for new features on our nominees and Literary Traveler staff predictions.  Then, come February 24th, when the stars are don their best dresses and tuxes, join us (in sweats, we don’t judge!) to see who takes home a shiny new “Fauxscar”.  It’s an honor just to be nominated, though, right?  Happy Awards Show Season!

And the Nominees are…

Best Character Portrayal by an Actor: 

  

Best Character Portrayal by an Actress:
  
Best Portrayal of a Literary Love Story:
  
Best Visual Representation of a Novel’s Setting: 
    
Best “Almost as Good as the Book” Film:
  
Best “Young Adult” Adaptation:
  
Best “Family Fun” Adaptation:
  
  • John Carter
  • The Lorax
  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days
Best Adaptation of a Classic:
  
Best “Guilty Pleasure” Adaptation:
  
  • Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part II
  • The Hunger Games
  • Total Recall
  • The Lucky One
  • The Bourne Legacy
Best “Stand Alone” Film:
  
Best Anticipated Literary Adaptation of 2013:
  
  • World War Z
  • The Great Gatsby
  • Great Expectations
  • Beautiful Creatures
  • The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

 

Fauxscar Nominee: Anna Karenina

December 18, 2012 in Book Review, Classic Literature, European Writers, Fauxscars, Leo Tolstoy, Literary Movies

Great film adaptations of classic novels are all alike; every junk Hollywood movie is terrible in its own way. Which way will the 2012 adaptation of Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina go? We don’t know yet, but I can guess.

The 2012 adaptation of the tragic romance was released at the Toronto Film Festival, and so far, reviews have been mixed. Some critics have praised director Joe Wright’s “bold new structure,” which highlights the theatrical nature of the novel by setting most of the action on a stage, but others have called the thoroughly modern version of the Russian love story flat, even emotionally distant. The Hollywood Reporter goes so far to complain that “whereas the book is sprawling, searching and realistic, the film is constricted, deterministic and counterfeit.”

It’s particularly disappointing to read this review (and others like it) because I love Anna Karenina, and re-read it quite frequently, probably every other year. The 900-page novel is a massive undertaking, and I have to admit I often pick and choose which scenes I focus on. Some—like the lengthy descriptions of Levin farming—are tedious and forgettable. But others, particularly the scene when Anna enters the ballroom in her black, low-cut dress, sparkling and pale like a diamond, transform the way I view the world. They make me look in the mirror differently, searching for traces of aristocracy in my own winter-pale face. They make me consider the terrifying and all-consuming nature of love, and the many ramifications of betrayal.

Though I do want to see Anna Karenina, I can’t help but feel that no movie could truly do that book justice. I also wonder whether Keira Knightly, who has been cast as Anna, will be able to live up to the role. I always imagined Anna as voluptuous, lush and gorgeous. Keira is certainly beautiful, but she lacks a richness that infuses Tolstoy’s Anna. More than just pretty—a compliment more aptly applied to the girlish Kitty—Anna is rich, poised and erotic. Jude Law, cast in the role of her somber, dry husband, might seem like the more shocking choice, but Law has shown a great range in the past few years. I’m interested to see what he can do with a character I never liked and often skimmed past.

The trailer, too, gives me some hope. It’s beautiful to watch, and while some might worry about style over substance, I happen to love a perfectly choreographed film. It doesn’t hit theaters until November 16, but I can assure you, I’ll be watching.

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